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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Incentivizing Employees and Boosting Productivity (#4 Includes Blueprint Storage Rack)

It’s obvious: most managers strive to eliminate the kinds of disruptions that cause their employees to lose productivity throughout the day. The trouble is, lost productivity rarely has one simple cause. When managers try a one-size-fits-all strategy to get more results from their team, they may often find that their efforts do more harm than good.

To create a workplace that supports your employees and drives them to be as productive as possible requires a multi-faceted approach. You’ll need everyone within your organization onboard in order to really get the ball moving—from the most senior members of your executive team to your most entry level employees. That said, here’s how to motivate your employees and make them more productive (#4 includes blueprint storage rack).

#1. Happier Employees Make Better Workers

A 2015 study revealed that happy employees do better work. In fact, happier participants were 12% more productive than the control group.[1] This most likely translates into not only more personal success but success for the business—aka more business growth.

Here’s the Assumption

Needless to say, some business leaders may feel that it’s just too expensive or challenging to incentivize employees to be more productive; of course, any employee would prefer to have more time off, added benefits, and higher pay—so they say.

The Truth

The truth is, incentivizing techniques, like paying employees more, actually drives companies’ revenue; just ask Waye Cascio, a University of Colorado, Denver management professor, who found that Costco is still more profitable than Sam’s Club even when employee wages are 40% higher.[2]

#2. The Number of Vacation Days May Not Matter  

Companies, like Kickstarter, learned that unlimited vacation policies work better in theory than in practice.[3]

Contrary to what some may think, employees weren’t keen on taking months off. In fact, when the decision on how much vacation to take was left up to employees, they’re more likely to consider the optics than whether or not they genuinely need a break from work; someone who takes a week of vacation every month clearly appears less dedicated to their job versus someone who takes one day a year.

Consider a Vacation Policy That Counters American Work Culture

The lack of vacation days taken shows that it’s not so much the number of days that are the issue but the American work culture—shaming employees if they dare call out. Ultimately, not have breaks from works leads to higher chances of burnout and a loss in productivity.

Combat this by having a common-sense vacation policy in place that encourages employees to take time away from work so that they can recharge and relax, returning back to the office fully ready to work.

#3. Free Coffee Doesn’t Mean Positive Work Culture

Higher-ups may believe that giving employees free food, drinks, or other amenities is crucial to creating the kind of work environment that employers are looking for and can excel at.

However, some companies have found the opposite to be true. Nextivia, in particular, discontinued their free snack program because rather than a nice perk, employees were unhappy when their favorite snacks are unavailable.[4] In this case, more perks—aka more free snacks—didn’t help creative a positive culture.

#4. Increasing Productivity in the Office Starts with a Blueprint Storage Rack

Telecommuting and home offices are big trends in many industries; workers often cite  autonomy as one of the big perks of working from home.

And it makes sense. Having the ability to design your own home office is certainly a plus, but an organized office space is often essential to getting tasks done on time and staying on top of the work load.

When it comes to sorting through large printed documents, there’s no better choice than a blueprint storage rack specially designed to make it easy to flip between documents and select the right one in a matter of seconds. With less time digging for that one file in your cluttered filing cabinet, you can increase your time efficiency and get more done.

#5. Employee Engagement Increases Productivity

Company culture is one of the most important factors when employees choose to leave a job.  But the truth is, over half of the US workforce is not engaged in their work.[5]

This most likely means a dip in productivity, as the more engaged your employees are, the more productive they’ll be. In fact, according to Harvard Business Review, highly engaged organizations have over one-fifth higher productivity (22%).[6]

Companies who don’t keep their employees engaged risk high turnover rates and, with that, more expenses in training employees—possibly as much as 16% of an employee’s hourly salary.[7]

Take Action to Increase Employee Engagement

At the end of the day, especially with millennials moving jobs almost every year, it is important for companies to keep their employees engaged, taking steps like being transparent and treating employees as business partners.[8]

Final Thoughts: Develop Your Workforce

The truth is, high-quality employees create high-quality work. You can identify which skills and general personality traits are most prevalent in your high-performing employers. Work with your human resources department to develop a recruiting plan that seeks out individuals with these skill sets. Making sure new employees are the right fit for your company, versus the best at their job, is an important part of building a strong team.

Consider Internal and External Hires

Many companies overlook their current staff when seeking to fill a new role or backfill a recently vacated position. A fresh outsider’s perspective is valuable, but employees who have been with the company for some time also have a uniquely valuable perspective. Evaluate both internal and external candidates with the same level of scrutiny to avoid creating negative perceptions among your existing employees.

Creating transparent career paths allows each worker to understand how high performance in their current position can lead to a better position in the future. Offering training, job shadowing, and/or other forms of personal development time, helps your employees understand how valuable they are to your company.

What It Comes Down To

Much of creating a company that supports productivity is about utilizing your resources wisely— whether that means designing a training program to better develop specific employee skills to installing a blueprint storage rack in each office.

Overall, letting your employees know just how valuable they are to the success of your organization, and demonstrating it appropriately via bonuses and a suitable benefits package will help incentivize your workforce and boost productivity.

What have you done to increase productivity at the office? How do you incentivize employees to stay on track and produce above-average work? Do you use a blueprint storage rack? Is there a productivity tip you’d like to share? Let us know by commenting in the comments section below.

Summary

  • It’s Simple: Happier employees are more productive
  • In fact, happier employees in the study were 12% more productive than the control
  • Employees need to bypass common misconceptions and take action to incentivize employees
  • One way is by increasing employee salary
  • Surprisingly, Costco which pays its employees more than Sam’s Club, was 40% more profitable disproving the myth that high employee salaries negatively affect company budget
  • Number of vacation days is irrelevant since American work culture shames employees for taking time off
  • Instead of focusing on number of days, consider creating a vacation policy that encourages employees to get out of the office and avoid burnout
  • Free food perks actually may hinder company culture, as was the case with Nextivia—consider using other ways to incentivize employees
  • Increase productivity in the office by installing a blueprint storage rack, which allows for easy storage
  • Employee engagement is an indicator whether employees may consider work elsewhere
  • Sadly, more than half of the American workforce reports to not be engaged with their jobs
  • Highly engaged companies were 22% more productive
  • Not taking steps to counter engagement rate may increase your turnover rate, which can be as much as 16% of an employee’s hourly pay
  • Use resources wisely and consider a blueprint storage rack to boost productivity in the office and allow employees to get more work completed
  • Seek internal and external hires to show and employees that they can move up in the company—another way to incentivize and increase work performance
  • Work with HR to develop a recruitment plan to attract and retain high performers
  • Get every level involved in not just company culture but increasing company productivity

Interested in increasing organization and productivity in the office? Want to decrease clutter?  For more information about a blueprint storage rack, feel free to contact Big Blueprint Hanger.

[1] Fortune: Study: Being happy at work really makes you more productive

[2] Inc.: How Paying Employees More Can Make You More Profitable

[3] Fast Company: Kickstarter Nixes Unlimited Vacation Time for Employees

[4] Entrepreneur: Why Perks Don’t Make a Company Culture

[5] Aon Media Center: Employee Engagement Declining Across the Globe

[6] Harvard Business Review: Employee Engagement Does More Than Boost Productivity

[7] Huffington Post: High Turnover Costs Way More Than You Think

[8] Inc.: 10 Best Ways to Keep Employees Happy, Engaged, and Motivated